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Art is not what you see but what you make others see.

Edgar Degas

NEXT STEP: BLOCKING

Living in the environment helps create the blocking. Once students can picture their environment(s) in their “mind’s eye,” they are ready to BLOCK themselves into the world(s) they have envisioned for their character (s). Using their “set”/environment(s), they can figure out what they should DO in their world(s)?

Doing is an ACTION that makes it possible for an interper to live truthfully under imaginary circumstances. 

TO ACT MEANS TO DO: An ACTION must be physically capable of being done. The action or movement (blocking) must also look real and be motivated by the script. The interper should not walk across the room without reason or motivation to do so. Actions must be purposeful. Actors use props on the stage, but interpers must perform the actions and movements without these. All of these choices are dependent on the rules and guidelines in your league or state. The NSDA does not restrict movement.

Have your students practice with real or similar objects. Whether it is typing, sweeping, drinking from a glass, opening a door, or folding clothes, the interper must perform their actions realistically. To appreciate the use and handling of objects, we suggest watching the Humorous Interp “I Hate My Sister Maggie“ performed by Thomas Finley, 2003 national champion.

According to A Practical Handbook for the Actor by Melissa Bruder, Lee Michael Cohen, Madeleine Olnek, Nathaniel Pollack, Robert Previto, and Scott Zigler:

ACTIONS MUST

Be physically capable of being done

Have a “Cap.” The “physical cap” is a symbol of a character finishing their task in their story

Be fun to do

Be in line with the intention of the author

Be specific